FISP (Local Law 11) Deadline Rapidly Approaching

 

By: Brian Sullivan 

It’s hard to believe that we are already halfway through 2018. Among other realities, this brings to light the fact that the deadline for FISP sub cycle 8C (February 21, 2019) will be here before we know it. I recently learned that approximately 6,000 of the 14,000+/- buildings required to file a FISP report during cycle 8, have yet to do so. Filing a FISP report late can come with some significant penalties: $1,000 annually, plus a $250 per month civil penalty.

All buildings required to comply with FISP, and with a block number ending in 1, 2 or 3, must file a report within sub cycle 8C. To check the block number for your building, visit the DOB BIS site,  or reach out to our team at Sullivan Engineering, who will be happy toassist you.

At Sullivan Engineering, we strongly advise that building owners retain a professional at least 6 months prior to any filing deadline to:

 

  1. Avoid scheduling issues with the professional performing the inspection.

Over the past few years the exterior restoration construction schedule across NYC has finished later and later. As a result, the annual slowdown in the industry that previously occurred around Thanksgiving now occurs after the New Year, if at all. Many professionals that used to fill the gap between November and February filing FISP reports are now very busy with active restoration projects.

  1. Avoid scheduling issues with the contractor providing the boom lift and/or scaffold.

Similarly, contractors that used to have workmen and equipment readily available to assist with providing access for FISP inspections have been very busy wrapping up projects before winter weather sets in.

  1. Ensure that a proper, thorough report can be submitted.

A thorough detailed FISP report can be A Roadmap to a Building’s Good Health . When a qualified professional is able to allocate the proper amount of time to perform the FISP inspection and develop the report, the result often leads to more accurate and efficient design for recommended repairs by the same professional or another firm inheriting the report. This will likely lead to more cost-effective proposals from contractors.

  1. Reduce the risk of price increases due to supply and demand issues near the deadline.

As previously reported, the DOB FISP team stated that approximately 100 qualified inspectors regularly submit FISP reports. That number of professionals performing 6,000 inspections and creating the subsequent reports over the next 7 months could potentially lead to a supply and demand problem. Scheduling challenges for inspectors and contractors could lead to this work being performed during overtime hours, rather than straight time.

One of the most critical advantages to not waiting to file until the end of the cycle is the ability for building owners to react and plan. If minor repairs are required to improve a building’s filing classification (e.g. SWARMP to Safe), these repairs could possibly be performed before filing. If more extensive repairs are required, accurate budgets can be determined prior to end of year budget planning. Budgeting for an exterior restoration project can take several years of budget adjustments. If work is to be performed in 2019, then design and bidding should be take place in the fall or winter of 2018.

If you have any questions regarding the FISP process, your building’s specific compliance requirements, or, if you would like to consider retaining Sullivan Engineering to perform your inspection, please feel free to contact us.

Contact: Tkhoudary@sullivanengineeringllc.com

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